An untested expansion for my non-existent game

Some more rules for my chess/wargame idea:

Pieces that have at least one action can try to taunt or intimidate enemy pieces.

To taunt a piece, they have to be able to take you, and have higher adds (including bonuses for assists). The enemy player rolls one die. If the result is higher than the enemy piece’s Quality, it immediately attacks. Taunting only counts as an action if the roll is lower than or equal to the piece’s Quality.

To intimidate a piece, you have to be able to take it and have higher adds (again including bonuses for assists), and the enemy piece has to have an empty square behind it (behind meaning ‘towards the enemy player’). The enemy player rolls one die. If the result is higher than the enemy piece’s Quality, it immediately retreats one space. Intimidating only counts as an action if the roll is lower than or equal to the piece’s Quality.

In this example position, the white pawn might want to taunt the black bishop so that the queen can attack the king. Similarly, the black rook might want to intimidate the white knight.

Anyway, I know posting ideas and not testing them is annoying, but I’m spending all my writing time on my Gigacrawler game. Hopefully I’ll be able to come back to this.

Blood Bowl: am I playing it wrong?

I recently got a copy of the Blood Bowl computer game. I knew of the board game in the 80s, but had never played it.

Anyway I’m playing a team of humans. Some of the players are noted as being ‘throwers’ or ‘catchers’. However I almost never pass, because passing seems to be much harder than knocking over opposing players.

I just played a computer-controlled human team and they didn’t pass either. However, I wonder if I’m missing anything. Anyone read this blog and know the game?

A game idea.

People on Boardgamegeek told me that the following idea wasn’t commercially viable. Does anyone think it sounds interesting?

An add-on for chess, inspired by Song of Blades and Heroes.

Components are as follows:

  • 32 counters.
  • Markers to indicate pieces that have moved in the current turn.
  • A track and marker to keep track of the maximum number of pieces that can move in a turn, and have already moved.

The players have to provide a chess set.

Each player has 16 counters, each giving numbers for Quality (2-5) and Combat (0-3).

White places one counter randomly beneath each piece, and black copies white’s layout (the counters have letters to make this easier).

The game works the same as Song of Blades and Heroes: you attempt to move a piece by rolling your choice of 1-3 dice. Results between 1 and the piece’s Quality are successes. Each success lets you move the piece once (although if a piece attempts to take, it can’t move any further that turn). Two failures on the same piece mean the end of your turn. You can only roll for a given piece once per turn.

There is a maximum number of pieces that can be moved per turn. This starts at 2, and goes up by 1 each time it’s reached, to a maximum of 8.

When a piece attempts to take, the two players roll 1 dice and add the relevant Combat rating. Doubling the other piece’s total destroys it. Otherwise the losing piece moves 1 square backwards, being taken if that square is occupied or the move would take them off the board. The attacker wins ties, and gets +1 for every piece on their side that could have moved into the disputed square.

You have to declare check, but the other player isn’t obliged to get out of check. The object is to actually destroy the king.